Tagged: physiology

How to slice a human body

The 19th century saw major advances in the practice of surgery. In 1750, the anatomist John Hunter described it as “a humiliating spectacle of the futility of science”; yet, over the next 150 years...

What causes body odor?

Most of us don’t need more than one whiff to identify that generally unpleasant, characteristic smell we call body odor. But it’s a surprisingly complex phenomenon, influenced by our genetic makeup, age, diet, and...

Is your thyroid an underperformer?

You may be surprised to learn that the most commonly prescribed medication in the U.S. isn’t one of the statins or a blood pressure drug—it’s levothyroxine, a synthetic version of a thyroid hormone (called...

About the human eye

The human eye, the organ responsible for the sense of sight, is a very complex structure. We use our vision in almost every activity, so the eye is a most important organ. How vision works...

How your digestive system works

Across the planet, humans eat on average between 1 and 2.7 kilograms of food a day, and every last scrap makes its way through the digestive system. Comprised of ten organs covering nine meters,...

What happens during a stroke?

Every two seconds, someone in the world has a stroke. One out of every six people will have a stroke at some point in their lives. Strokes deprive brain cells of oxygen and are...

How bacteria rule over your body

The human microbiota consists of the 10-100 trillion symbiotic microbial cells harbored by each person, primarily bacteria in the gut; the human microbiome consists of the genes these cells harbor. Microbiome projects worldwide have...

2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has today decided to award the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of molecular...